My photo of Veil Nebula

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252 Lights. 60 second exp each. 29 Darks. 28 Flats. 29 Dark Flats. 800 ISO. Total integration: 4 hours, 12 minutes. Bortle 3 (backyard, north east Oregon farm.)

Processed in PixInsight and Photoshop. Image cropped.

RedCat on Sky-Watcher EQ6-R Pro with Zwo mini guide cam and scope via PhD2. Cam: DSLR, Canon 90D. Polar align via SharpCap.

Photo includes NGC 6960, the Western Veil, an emission nebula, the western part of the remnant, also called the “Witch’s Broom”, as well as part of The Cygnus Loop (radio source W78, or Sharpless 103).

“The Veil Nebula is a cloud of heated and ionized gas and dust in the constellation Cygnus.

“It constitutes the visible portions of the Cygnus Loop, a supernova remnant, many portions of which have acquired their own individual names and catalogue identifiers. The source supernova was a star 20 times more massive than the Sun which exploded between 10,000 and 20,000 years ago.

“Some arcs of the loop, known collectively as the Veil Nebula or Cirrus Nebula, emit in the visible electromagnetic range. Radio, infrared, and X-ray images reveal the complete loop.

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Last night’s photo of Butterfly Nebula in Sadr Region in Cygnus. More info and more of my pix here: https://www.astrobin.com/users/BipTunia/40 Lights. 60 second exp each. 29 Darks. 28 Flats. 29 Dark Flats. 800 ISO. Total integration: 40 minutes. Bortle 3 (backyard, north east Oregon farm.) Processed in PixInsight and Photoshop. Image cropped.
RedCat on Sky-Watcher EQ6-R Pro mount with Zwo mini guide cam and scope via PhD2. Cam: DSLR, Canon 90D. Polar align via SharpCap.
#astrophotography #astronomy #astrobin

Star Adventurer is frustrating. I returned mine. FYI, I would not try to put a scope on Star Adventurer, just a DSLR with ball mount. It gets thrown off too easy otherwise.

Using Deep Sky Stacker for better space photos

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I took these photos using this gear and methods. I took 15 of each area, and also took 15 DARKS (photos same settings same night same temp same camera with the lens cap on, to produce a record of the noise inherent to the camera CCD to remove with software later.)

I ran the RAW photo files through Photoshop using a script to batch turn them all into TIFFs, with no compression and keeping the sizes the same. I used this tutorial on YouTube.

I used the free program Deep Sky Stacker, using this YouTube tutorial. I did the thing where I ran “Register Checked Photos”, and told it to only use 80% best photos. Then it ran. Took 15 to 30 min for each of the two sets.

Then I ran the resulting TIFF outputs through Adobe Lightroom Classic to turn up the contrast, de-haze, blacks, color saturation saturation a bit, and saved the profile as a starting point next time.

I tried auto-removing the little bit of purple fringing, but kept it in, it makes the stars look a little more like jewels. lol.

Fun fact: DSS counts the stars before it runs. There are about 60,000 distinct visible stars in each of these photos.

I got a RedCat telescope so things might get even more interesting soon.